TRAFFORD-JSNA

Health & wellbeing

In summary, the health and well-being of people in Trafford is generally better than the England average.  However, there is wide variation within Trafford.  Healthy Life Expectancy in the most deprived 10% of areas in Trafford is around 16 years lower than in the least deprived 10%.  Reducing this inequality is the overarching priority of Trafford’s Health and Wellbeing Board.

Life expectancy

Life expectancy is a useful summary measure of the health of populations. 

Life expectancy at birth (LE) for the population living in an area represents the average number of years a person would expect to live based on contemporary mortality rates. 

Data for Trafford for 2014-16 show:

  • Male LE has reached 80.0 years, statistically significantly better than the England average (79.5 years)
  • Female LE has reached 83.7 years, statistically significantly better than the England average (83.1 years)

However, there are wide inequalities in LE within Trafford:

  • There is a 10.4 year gap in Male LE between the most and least deprived areas of Trafford, wider than in 2010-12 (9.9 years)
  • The gap for females is 8.2 years, again wider than in 2010-12 (6.1 years)

Healthy Life Expectancy at birth (HLE) is an important summary measure of mortality and morbidity in populations which brings an element of quality of life to length of life.  HLE represents the average number of years a person would expect to live in good health based on contemporary mortality rates and prevalence of self-reported good health.  

Data for Trafford for 2014-16 show:

  • Male HLE is 62.7 years, statistically similar to the England average (63.3 years)
  • Female HLE is 66.2 years, statistically significantly better than the England average (63.9 years)
  • However, the inequalities in HLE within Trafford are wider still than for LE.  Data for 2009-2013 combined show a gap in HLE of 15.8 years for males and 16.1 years for females between the least and the most deprived areas of Trafford. 

Causes of death

Infant mortality is an indicator of the general health of an entire population.  It reflects the relationship between causes of infant mortality and upstream determinants of population health such as economic, social and environmental condition.  The infant mortality rate in Trafford in 2015-17 is 3.8 per 1,000 live births, statistically similar to England (3.9 per 1,000).

The age standardised mortality rate from causes considered preventable for Trafford (186 per 100,000 population) is statistically similar to England (181.5 per 100,000) (2015-17 data) and has been reducing over time at a similar rate to England.  The basic concept of preventable mortality is that deaths are considered preventable if, in the light of the understanding of the determinants of health at the time of death, all or most deaths from the underlying cause (subject to age limits if appropriate) could potentially be avoided by public health interventions in the broadest sense.
Death rates for the main causes of premature mortality (cardiovascular disease, cancer, liver disease and respiratory disease), as well as the subsets within these causes considered preventable, are all statistically similar to England averages.

The age standardised suicide rate in Trafford (7.3 per 100,000 population) is statistically significantly lower than the England average (9.6 per 100,000) and the lowest among a group of 15 other statistically similar authorities. 

Lifestyle behaviours

  • An estimated 12.7% of Trafford adults are smokers, lower but statistically similar to the England average (14.9%), but rising to 26.8% among Routine and Manual workers (2017 data)
  • About 1 in 5 (21.6%) of Trafford adults are physically inactive, statistically similar to England average (22.2%) (2016/17 data)
  • 58.5% of Trafford adults meet the recommended ‘5-a-day’ portions of fruit and vegetables on an average day, statistically similar to England average (57.4%)
  • 56.1% of Trafford adults are overweight obese, significantly lower than the England average (61.3%), but nevertheless representing a significant public health issue for the borough.
  • The rate of hospital admissions for alcohol related condition is similar to England, but rising over time and therefore indications are that alcohol misuse represents an emerging threat to health and wellbeing locally.

Data source: PHE – Public Health Outcomes Framework

 

This page was last modified on 06/11/2018 15:06:00